A letter to Secretary of the Chinese Medicine Council of Hon

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A letter to Secretary of the Chinese Medicine Council of Hon

Postby queenie » Mon Sep 28, 2009 5:54 pm

A letter to Secretary of the Chinese Medicine Council of Hong Kong in 2005

Dear Mrs Ngan (Now Carmen Chan)
Secretary of the Chinese Medicine Council of Hong Kong


Further to our telephone dialogue about two weeks ago, I appreciate very
much for the meaningful conversation. Hearing your advice, I have just got, on 31st January, a Candidate examination booklet in which I find the above subject listed inside the Appendix I, violating the Section 61(1a) of the Chinese Medicine Ordinance, CMO, Chapter 549.

Where DID the CMO, Chinese Medicines Ordinance, have such a qualification requirement : "Part-time or Distance Learning courses will not be accepted" which is stipulated in Paragragh 3 of Appendix I in page 11 of your candidate booklet, for applicants of the subject examination?

The misleading, unreasonable & universally unacceptable requirement : "Part-time or Distance Learning courses will not be accepted" not only violates the Chinese Medicine Ordinance under which your Council is estabished and delegated authority of administration and scruitiny of the chinese medicine profession but also acts against the international academic tertiary rules of practice.

I never heard of the qualification of "Part-time or Distance Learning
courses will not be accepted" as the equivalents of the full time learning qualifications. There are many offshore Univerisities in the world, including Uinted Kingdom, USA, Australia which are offering the Part-time or Distance Learning degree level and post-graduate level courses in Hong Kong.

The Off-campus graduates obtain the same academic standard / qualifications as the full time graduates do, as advocated by many off-shore universities, taking for an example: The University of London offers external degrees of Law and Economics. The graduates under Law discipline are also recognised in Hong Kong and the Law Society of Hong Kong.

As far as I am concerned, for a professional body to assess the academic qualification for a candidate for registration purposes, she ususally asks if the academic degree is recognised in the related profession in the country the qualification obtained. if it is affirmative, then it is recognised as the equivalent standard. This practice is universally carried out when assessing the applicants who registrate as a member of a professional body, taking for an instance, the Hong Kong Institute of Certfified Public Accountants, which is also set up under the Professional Accountants Ordinance.

The same way of practice currently appies to many professional bodies in the world. Then why the Chinese Medicine Council of Hong Kong has acted against the international way of practice.

In addition, talking about the degrees and post-graduate degress of Open University of Hong Kong which is the local University offers degrees in a distance learning mode. Then are the qualifications not recognised in Hong Kong, just like the way your Councl currently practising?

To conclude straight, the Chinese Medicine Council of Hong Kong not only violates the the Chinese Medicine Ordinance and discriminates the off-campus graduates's recognised qualifications but also the way of practice is not up to standard.

I understand that your Council has done great effort to set up the registration procedures but please widen and be open in treating the status of "REAL" equivalents.

Your immediate remedial action is highly appreciated.

Camson Tang

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